Oklahoma Department of Human Services
Sequoyah Memorial Office Building, 2400 N. Lincoln Blvd. • Oklahoma City, OK 73105
(405) 521-3646 • Fax (405) 521-6684 • Internet: www.okdhs.org
 
Older Americans Act (Title III) programs
 

Find out what kind of services are available?
Services available at the Area Agencies on Aging (AAA) are numerous.  Services are provided by Older Americans Act funds. Contact your local AAA to find out what services are available. Services are provided to seniors 60 and over, as well as to individuals with disabilities or low-income individuals. Learn about the various services available:

    • Congregate and Home Delivered Meals:
      Meals are served each year, at local nutrition sites throughout Oklahoma, and to homebound individuals. Meals are planned by a Registered Dietitian and must meet one-third of the recommended daily requirement.

    • Evidence Based Health Promotion:
      Often located at the local nutrition site, health promotion services include provision of educational presentations, exercise programs, and health screening activities to persons sixty and older.

    • Nutrition Education:
      Information on the benefits of healthy eating and exercise are provided to congregate and homebound meal participants.

    • In-Home Assistance:
      Local projects are funded by Area Agencies on Aging to provide chore services, personal care, housekeeping, and home repair.

    • Outreach:
      Skilled outreach personnel in each county provide one-on-one assistance to help older persons make informed choices.  

    • Legal Services:
      Educational presentations on legal issues of interest to older adults are provided, as well as individual legal assistance. Legal assistance is provided through the Legal Aid Services of Oklahoma.

      Find out how to get legal services?
      Information about legal services can be obtained through the Area Agencies on Aging (AAA), or by contacting the Legal Services Developer at the Aging Services Division. Helpful documents, such as Do Not Resuscitate, guardianship information and end-of-life forms are available through Publications.

    • Transportation:
      Trips to the nutrition site, the bank, the doctor's office or grocery store allow older persons who no longer drive to remain independent in their communities. 

    • Caregiver Assistance:
      Services, education and support groups are available to family members who are caring for older persons.

      What type of services are available?

      • Assistance with access to community services
      • Counseling
      • Support groups
      • Training for caregivers
      • Respite services for caregivers
      • Other supplemental services
    • Grandparents Raising Grandchildren:
      A number of services are available to grandparents raising grandchildren.  Educational opportunities, conferences and support groups are available.

      Find out about grandparent support groups?
      The number of support groups for grandparents raising grandchildren is increasing in Oklahoma. Many of them offer child care so that both grandparents and their grandchildren have a chance to participate in the group. Support groups can offer: emotional support, guidance, assistance, advice, resources and information.

      Get information about services for grandparents raising grandchildren?
      A number of services are available to grandparents raising grandchildren (and other relatives serving as parents). To learn about services, resources and to get a manual entitled "Starting Points for Grandparents Raising Grandchildren," contact your local Area Agency on Aging 1-800-211-2116.  

    • Respite:
      Respite care is a temporary break from full-time caregiving duties. Respite vouchers help caregivers pay someone to temporarily take their place as a care provider. 

There is no income limit for:
Persons caring for individuals 60 and over
Grandparents 55 or older raising grandchildren 

    • Long-Term Care Ombudsman:
      Ombudsman advocate for the rights of residents in long-term care facilities. 

      Become a volunteer Ombudsman?
      The ombudsman program is supported by local volunteers who are committed to improving the lives of older persons in institutions. The Area Agencies on Aging Ombudsman Supervisors train, supervise and support the volunteers.  Persons interested in volunteering should contact the Ombudsman Supervisor in their area, or state office personnel.  

      Compare Nursing Homes?
      Medicare provides information to help individuals decide what nursing home will meet their needs.   The "Nursing Home Compare" allows searches by state, county, name of facility or proximity.     

      File a complaint with an Ombudsman?
      To file a complaint, simply contact the Ombudsman Supervisor in the Area Agencies on Aging in which the long-term care facility is located.   

      File a complaint with the Health Department?
      Long-term care facilities must be licensed by the Oklahoma Department of Health to provide care.  Complaints can be made directly to the Health Department (.pdf, 1 pp, 23.1KB).

      What does the ombudsman do with a complaint?
      A long-term care ombudsman is a person who receives complaints from residents of long-term care facilities, their friends or relative and attempts to resolve those complaints within the facility.  The Ombudsman has the authority to explore problems and recommend corrective action to the facility.

Locate an Area Agency on Aging?
There are 11 Area Agencies on Aging throughout the state.  Service areas are composed of counties. To locate a service area:

Area Agencies on Aging Locations
Area Agencies on Aging Key Personnel

Last Updated:  12/19/2013