Practice & Policy Lecture Series
 
 
Provided by the Oklahoma Department of Human Services
Sequoyah Memorial Office Building, 2400 N. Lincoln Blvd. • Oklahoma City, OK 73105
(405) 521-3646 • Fax (405) 521-6684 • Internet: www.okdhs.org

The Practice and Policy Lecture Series has been developed to provide thought-provoking presentations on Oklahoma's emerging policy issues, trends and best practices. The series is sponsored by the Oklahoma Department of Human Services Office of Planning, Research and Statistics and the University of Oklahoma Center for Public Management with the goal of providing the best educational opportunities available in a forum that offers participants an opportunity to question, share and learn from each other.

All lectures are free and open to the public.

Categories:
Aging
Child Care
Child Welfare
Customer Service
Developmental Disabilities
Domestic Violence
Economy
Faith-Based and Community Initiatives
Health Care
Leadership
Marriage and Family
Poverty Solutions
Technology

Picture of Michael Korenblit

Michael Korenblit

 

Michael Korenblit is president and co-founder of the Respect Diversity Foundation. Prior to moving back to Oklahoma in 1992, Korenblit worked 19 years for the Close Up Foundation, an educational organization in Washington, D.C. He held a number of positions, including Program Instructor, where he taught students and teachers about the governmental process and domestic and foreign policy issues. He also directed Close Up’s television and video department, where he produced television programs, which aired on the Cable Satellite Public Affairs network.

Korenblit is co-author of Until We Meet Again, the true story of love and survival in the Holocaust. He takes his audiences on a journey through time to Hrubieszow, a town in Poland, during the late 1930’s and 1940’s. He shares the stories of two families and the impact of the war on their lives. Korenblit's two main characters are Manya and Meyer, his parents. Although only 17, Manya and Meyer’s courage, faith, and love for each other were to sustain them though the loss of parents and siblings, constant fear and harsh conditions of hiding, separation from each other for two years, and numerous concentration, and death camps. Their survival was one miracle; meeting again was a second. Then there was a third.


Last Updated: June 18, 2015
 
Provided by the Oklahoma Department of Human Services
Street address: Sequoyah Memorial Office Building, 2400 N. Lincoln Blvd., Oklahoma City, OK 73105
Mailing address: P.O. Box 25352, Oklahoma City, OK 73125
(405) 521-3646
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